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Walleye Egg Taking
20050405-00shockingboat

Below Croton Dam, the shocking boat scoops up the 'stunned' walleyes.

20050405-01waiting

On shore, the DNR crew awaits the boat of walleye for processing

20050405-02shockerlanding

Look out fish, they are ready for you!

20050405-03fishtank

Some of the 'stunned' fish in the temporary holding tank. There were some that went 8 or 9 pounds!

20050405-04removingfish

The fish are sorted and placed into mesh tanks so the water flow can provide them oxygen.

20050405-05transferholding

After sorting, they are moved to a transport tank to the Pine Street landing where the egg taking will take place.

20050405-06milking

Here a DNR specialist slowly and carefully strips the eggs from the female walleye.

20050405-07milt

Next, milt is collected to fertilize the eggs.

20050405-08stireggs

Then the mixture of eggs and milt is gently stirred with a 'feather stirring' device. The eggs are so tender that a wooden or metal spoon would crush then.

20050405-09donewithone

After the eggs have been removed, the fish is handed over for weighing and measuring.

20050405-10measureing

All measurements are done like this! By hand!

20050405-11snipfin

To age the fish, a couple of fins are snipped and they will be measured for growth, sort of like the rings of a tree.

20050405-12crowd

It was a nice day and there were several spectators observing.

20050405-13rfid

In the future, the DNR will be implanting RFID devices like this one in selected fish. This Radio Frequency ID can be detected for nearly a mile. Most of the size is the battery.